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law school. he practiced law for some years and began his political career in 1968 when he was elected attorney general of missouri in his first place for public office. missouri voters elected him to the u.s. senate in 1976. they reelected him in 1982 and 1988, for a total of 18 years of service. the senator initiated major legislation in international trade, telecommunications, health care, research and development, transportation, and civil rights. he was later appointed special counsel by janet reno. he later represented the united states as u.s. ambassador to the united nations and served as a special envoy to sudan. he has been a great friend to missouri, st. louis, and washington university. please join me in welcoming him now. [applause] >> thank you. thank you very much. i owe our speaker an apology. when you hear the apology, you are going to conclude that i am a really terrible human being. i am the kind of person who takes advantage of a friend, especially a friend who is vulnerable. when he is vulnerable, i pounce. tonight's origin was a rehearsal dinner the night before t
. and then when re-elected as president again of planet earth's biggest nation, russia. vladimir putin biggest winner of 2012. >> "biggest loser," pat? >> general david petraeus. cia most famous general of his generation caught in a honey trap and kwon. >> the nra national rifle association which has no answer to why americans should be allowed to buy and possess assault weapons with rounds they can shoot off and kill little children. >> mark. >> the 23 million americans who remain out of work and have been out of work for a long period of time. >> seldom aidle son who backed candidates with millions of dollars, including mitt romney, and though lost. >> how many millions? >> all total? >> five or something? i think it's in the neighborhood of the 70s. >> yeah. >> right. he is moving along. the biggest loser of 2012 lance armstrong for using performance-enhancing drugs. armstrong was stripped of his tour de france titles and sponsor contracts worth 15 to $18 million. biggest loser. >>> okay. best politician. >> wisconsin governor scott walker. he put through his right to work laws. he didn't w
. >> this government would lead the country in a transitional phase, which would end with new elections. they could be presidential elections if the parties concerned agree to it, or parliamentary elections.% >> but what role syria's president assad might play -- on that brahimi said nothing. syria's opposition has already dismissed his suggestions. hope for a rapid end to the bloodshed seems optimistic. >> syria will be the special focus later this half hour. >> we will have a special report from the turkish-syrian border. in other news, u.s. president barack obama has broken off his christmas vacation to resume talks on the so-called fiscal cliff, taxes and spending cuts unless democrats and republicans reach a deal by new year's eve. >> nearly all the major players in those negotiations are starting to agree on one thing, and that is that a deal is virtually impossible by that deadline. senior officials say there is little hope of a grand bargain to shave trillions of dollars off of america's mountain of debt. >> applause for the bell at the start of the trading day is a daily ritual at the new
the queen, i believe as prime minister t morning after you won the election i believe that you're meeting was slight ackquard that a few things happened that weren't protocol. do you remember what happened. he says well what do they do in the film? so blair used the film that we had made up as a way to answer that question. so it's an extraordinary reversal of things. >> howard and david, so with both shows, with "homeland" now and with "24" in the past, were there actions with various government agencies particularly with terism with yourself and those agencies and did they respond at all to what was going on on in the show? >> no. they really were -- the show is so fundamentally propost rouse, the ood that so much could happen and have a middle and end in 24 shours fundamentally crazy and "homeland" deposit that is the cia is operating on our soil which as far as i know isn't happening. but there is emotional truth to the characters and our relationship with the military and count terism agencies. they were fans. they became fans of the show and they just kind of, we got calls from peop
we live in a center-right country. if you look at the last two presidential elections that doesn't seem to be the case. are we living now in a new, progressive era? >> in terms of the presidency, i think we are, paul. i'm not sure about the country. barack obama i think is the center left or left wing president since the great depression and i think that what barack obama has in mind to do is indeed to redistribute income from the top downward, not to cut spending, but to increase spending, it's explicit from a 20% of gdp to 25% gdp and rather than cut spending raise taxes as necessary to support that spending and i would say that is in fact essentially the french model. and the question is whether it can support enough growth in the economy. >> paul: taxes are going up, we know that, spending, going up for sure even before the health care law kicks in. so, we are moving in that direction, particularly in the entitlement state. not reforming it, but actually expanding it. >> aen what happened this year was the supreme court helping this along, you have the justices essentially re
career in 1968 when he was elected attorney general of missouri in his first place for public office. missouri voters elected him to the u.s. senate in 1976. they reelected him in 1982 and 1988, for a total of 18 years of service. the senator initiated major legislation in international trade, telecommunications, health care, research and development, transportation, and civil rights. he was later appointed special counsel by janet reno. he later represented the united states as u.s. ambassador to the united nations and served as a special envoy to sudan. he has been a great friend to missouri, st. louis, and washington university. please join me in welcoming him now. [applause] >> thank you. thank you very much. i owe our speaker an apology. when you hear the apology, you are going to conclude that i am a really terrible human being. i am the kind of person who takes advantage of a friend, especially a friend who is vulnerable. when he is vulnerable, i pounce. tonight's origin was a rehearsal dinner the night before the wedding of victoria will, george's only daughter. george was st
democracy work." i said, by the way, will it be translated into chinese? the elections in this book are important for the chinese and i believe the chinese leadership would read this book. he said that they are in the middle of trying to do that right now. and sure enough, the book sold very well in china. and justice breyer went to china in june. he was very well received, talking about his book, including what i thought was a wonderful moment of poetic justice. on the cover here -- as you all know, here he is as the cover story. and that is interesting. what i find even more interesting is the date of this magazine is june 4. so, i thought to myself -- that might have been lost on the editor. so, it has thrilled me know wind that someone as imminent as justice breyer has become increasingly engaged on this topic. when we were talking earlier, he talked about during the conversation. and i said, "trust me, i am going to drag you into this thing every step of the way." if you ever lose your day job, you could be a permanent diplomat. we are very pleased to have him here today. where
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7

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